The “as-a-Service” trend has been growing like crazy. The first one to make it popular, Software-as-a-Service, or SaaS, has changed the way people in nearly all industries look at the way they use applications, and has simultaneously simplified and complexified technological endeavors from everyone from the web developer to the content marketer to the healthcare professional.

But this trend doesn’t end with SaaS. We have CenturyLink’s Big-Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS). We have Microsoft’s IoT-as-a-Service (okay, that acronym is just too long–IoTaaS). We even have Ransomware-as-a-Service.

Next up, Blockchain-as-a-Service (BaaS).

Blockchain’s hype has reached far and wide, driven in no small part by soaring prices of popular cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and ethereum. Blockchain, the technology that is so essential to these decentralized currencies, is also proving useful for things like supply chain management, healthcare, government, and more. Blockchain development, however, can prove difficult.

Enter Stratis and IBM, both of whom are now offering Blockchain-as-a-Service.

Stratis is a complex creature of a company with a whole lot to offer consumers and businesses alike. They offer their own cryptocurrency token  (STRAT) and wallet as well as learning materials for developers and like-minded folks who are interested in understanding blockchain technology. But they don’t stop there. Stratis is offering a complete, end-to-end solution for developing, testing, and deploying blockchains.

To do this, they use a blockchain technology called a sidechain, which is basically a branch off of the main blockchain, a tech that many major blockchain networks have not employed.

Stratis shows a substantial understanding of consumer and business needs, and their BaaS offering could help companies implement many beneficial applications of blockchain without all the fuss of having to setup their own blockchain network from scratch.

IBM is also offering Blockchain-as-a-Service on their “High Security Business Network.” IBM is pushing the industry disruption angle on their site, and show use cases for blockchain in pharmaceutical, petroleum, government, healthcare, insurance, and, of course, finance.  These can range from shipment tracking to fraud prevention to clinical trials. Of course, IBM recently also decided to create a shipment blockchain solution with major trucking company, Maersk.

One of the original BaaS options came from Redmond’s Azure. This may indicate a trend, and we will likely see even more novel uses of blockchain in the very near future thanks to Blockchain-as-a-Service.

Have you ever used BaaS? Do you have any ideas you think would benefit from blockchain technology? Let us know in the comments below!